'Ohana Mammography Center

Mammography Screening Guidelines and You

Breast cancer screening guidelines

National organizations that publish guidelines about breast cancer screening have different recommendations depending on age and risk factors, so it is important for you to discuss the best screening option with your doctor.

Around age 40, you should talk to your doctor about when to begin mammograms. Women age 50 and older should have a screening mammogram at least every other year - and more often for women whose risk for breast cancer is greater.

For women of average risk*, the American Cancer Society recommends that between the ages of 45-54 they have an annual screening. At age 55, women can choose to change the frequency to every other year. Alternatively, the U.S. Preventative Task Force recommends starting mammograms when women reach age 50; and, at that age, the task force recommends mammograms every other year. A summary of expert recommendations is listed below:

Organization: American Cancer Society
Minimum Age To Start: 40 (Individual choice)
How Often: 45-54 (every year)

Organization: The American Society of Breast Imaging
Minimum Age To Start: 40 (Individual choice)
How Often: 55-On (every 1-2 years)

Organization: US Preventative Task Force
Minimum Age To Start: 40 (Individual choice)
How Often: 50-74 (every 2 years)

Organization: American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Minimum Age To Start: 40
How Often: Every Year

Organization: American College of Radiology
Minimum Age To Start: 40
How Often: Every Year

Organization: The Society of Breast Imaging
Minimum Age To Start: 40
How Often: Every Year

Organization: National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Minimum Age To Start: 40
How Often: Every Year

*Patients with a family history or other increased risk factors should consult with their primary care physician regarding recommendations for screening.

If, at any time or age, you detect a lump or notice a change in your breast health, you should contact your health care provider. Learn more about your risk of breast cancer »

Also of interest...

How can we make this page better for you?

We welcome your comments here »

Back To Top